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English 4 Lesson 150: To what extent was I pulled into the movies ‘Mockingbird vs Heat’ as a participant rather than as an observer?

Welcome back to my school essays, I hope you enjoy it and let’s begin!

Movies have the ability to transport us to another world and make us feel like we are part of the story. Some movies are so immersive that we feel like we are participants in the action, rather than just observers. In this essay, we will explore the extent to which two movies, “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Heat,” pull the audience in as participants rather than observers.

“To Kill a Mockingbird” is a 1962 movie based on the novel of the same name by Harper Lee. The movie tells the story of a young girl, Scout, and her brother, Jem, growing up in the South during the 1930s. The movie explores themes of racism, injustice, and morality. The main character, Atticus Finch, played by Gregory Peck, is a lawyer who defends a black man accused of rape.

The movie pulls the audience in as participants in several ways. First, the movie uses a child’s perspective to show the world around them. The audience experiences the world through Scout and Jem’s eyes, which makes the story more relatable and emotional. We see the events unfold from a child’s point of view, which makes the events more powerful and impactful.

Second, the movie explores themes that are still relevant today, such as racism and injustice. The movie challenges the audience’s views and forces them to confront their own biases and prejudices. The audience is not just watching the story unfold; they are actively engaged in the themes and issues that the story raises.

Finally, the movie has a powerful message about morality and doing what is right, even when it is difficult. The audience is pulled into the story as participants because they are rooting for Atticus and his quest for justice. They want to see him succeed and overcome the odds, and they feel invested in the outcome of the trial.

In contrast, “Heat” is a 1995 movie that tells the story of a group of criminals who plan a heist while being pursued by a dedicated police officer. The movie stars Al Pacino and Robert De Niro and features intense action sequences and suspenseful moments. The movie explores themes of loyalty, betrayal, and the consequences of violence.

Unlike “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Heat” does not pull the audience in as participants to the same extent. While the movie has intense action sequences and suspenseful moments, the audience is still primarily an observer. The audience is not invested in the characters or their motivations in the same way as they are in “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

However, “Heat” does pull the audience in as participants in a different way. The movie explores the consequences of violence and the toll it takes on the characters. The audience is forced to confront the reality of violence and the impact it has on those who are involved. The movie also explores the themes of loyalty and betrayal, which are relatable and emotional.

In conclusion, movies can pull the audience in as participants or observers, depending on how they are presented. “To Kill a Mockingbird” pulls the audience in as participants through the use of a child’s perspective, relevant themes, and a powerful message about morality. The audience is invested in the characters and their quest for justice. “Heat” pulls the audience in as participants through the exploration of the consequences of violence and the themes of loyalty and betrayal. The audience is forced to confront the reality of violence and the toll it takes on those who are involved. While the two movies are different in their approach, they both have the ability to pull the audience in and make them feel like participants in the story.

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